Monday, May 24, 2004

Michael Berg

Part of an editorial by Michael Berg, father of Nick Berg:

My son, Nick, was my teacher and my hero. He was the kindest, gentlest man I know; no, the kindest, gentlest human being I have ever known. He quit the Boy Scouts of America because they wanted to teach him to fire a handgun. Nick, too, poured into me the strength I needed, and still need, to tell the world about him.

People ask me why I focus on putting the blame for my son's tragic and atrocious end on the Bush administration. They ask: "Don't you blame the five men who killed him?" I have answered that I blame them no more or less than the Bush administration, but I am wrong: I am sure, knowing my son, that somewhere during their association with him these men became aware of what an extraordinary man my son was. I take comfort that when they did the awful thing they did, they weren't quite as in to it as they might have been. I am sure that they came to admire him.

I am sure that the one who wielded the knife felt Nick's breath on his hand and knew that he had a real human being there. I am sure that the others looked into my son's eyes and got at least a glimmer of what the rest of the world sees. And I am sure that these murderers, for just a brief moment, did not like what they were doing.

George Bush never looked into my son's eyes. George Bush doesn't know my son, and he is the worse for it. George Bush, though a father himself, cannot feel my pain, or that of my family, or of the world that grieves for Nick, because he is a policymaker, and he doesn't have to bear the consequences of his acts. George Bush can see neither the heart of Nick nor that of the American people, let alone that of the Iraqi people his policies are killing daily.


Okay, while I understand this mans grief, I do not understand his reasoning.

First, his son chose to go to Iraq to better his business. Bush did not force him to go, he went of his own accord. As a matter of fact, this was his second trip. Now, not to sound harsh, if his father was so worried, why didn't he try and stop him?

Second, IF he really thinks the monsters who took his sons life gave a second thought about his humanity, he is joking himself. All they saw was a chance to kill an infidel.

Third, Mr. Berg says "George Bush, though a father himself, cannot feel my pain, or that of my family, or of the world that grieves for Nick, because he is a policymaker, and he doesn't have to bear the consequences of his acts." What acts are those? Again, his son CHOSE to make that trip to Iraq. His son was not a member of the military. His son was a businessman trying to expand his business.

But, let's look at it from another perspective. If Mr. Berg means that because we went to war the president is responsible for his sons death, my question is still, who forced Nick to go there?

Fourth, Don't you find it just a little odd that Mr. Berg can find the humanity of the person who took a knife and cut his sons head off yet, he can't find the humanity for Bush, who had nothing to do with his death?

Lastly, If something like this were to have happened to my child, the LAST thing I would try and do is make a political issue of it, which is just what Mr. Berg is doing.

Call me a jerk, or worse, for my statements but, I find Mr. Bergs statements just a little too strange.